Education

Individualized Educational Program (IEP)

What is the purpose of an IEP?
-Establishes measurable annual goals for the child
-States the special education and related services and supplementary aids and services that the public agency will provide to, or on behalf of, the child

The IEP is developed jointly by the school system, the parents of the child, and the student (when appropriate) with the following specific information:
-the child's present level of academic achievement and functional performance, describing how the child is currently doing in school and how the child's disability affects his or her involvement and progress in the general curriculum
-annual goals for the child, meaning what parents and the school team think he or she can reasonably accomplish in a year
-the specific education and related services to be provided to the child, including supplementary aids and services (such as a communication device) and changes to the program or supports for school personnel
-how much of the school day the child will be educated separately from children without disabilities
-how (and if) the child is to participate in state or district-wide assessments, including what modification to tests the child needs
-when services and modifications will begin, how often they will be provided, where they will be provided, and how long they will last
-how school personnel will measure the child's progress toward the annual goals

Additionally, the IEP team broadly considers the child's involvement and participation in three main areas of school life:

1) the general education curriculum
2) extracurricular activities
3) nonacademic activities

The IEP can be understood as the blueprint, or plan, for the special education experience of a child with a disability across these school environments.